Horse Racing: The Secret Of Thinking Big Money And Not Thinking Small Money

The secret of thinking big money and not thinking little money is a frame of mind the player need to have if he or she is to make big money. The mass majority of players that consider Return On Investment (ROI) in racing usually consider making a few hundred dollars in profit over a few wagers spent. Or an ROI of a few cents or nickles on the dollars. There’s another way which is as simple and straight forward but much more powerful. This is the case where you intend to play racing as a job or career and play 1,000’s of races over several or more years and not as a pass time.

An example: in the course of 10 years exact at any major track in the USA when the money is summed for all wager types for such a time period it adds into more than several millions of dollars. If you sum the total for 4-5 major tracks it reaches over $30,000,000 for that same period. $30,000,000: THAT’S REAL NAVY, SON! If you’re thinking about getting 5%-70% of that then you’re thinking big money, big business and not gambling. Why? Because you’ll never see the day when gambling will net you that type of money. You need design and not luck.

Thinking small money will not do so either. And you can put your money down on that and win. The secret of thinking big money and not thinking small money in racing is to think big money in the right way. To repeat: the right way. Of course you can play the pick 6 and get lucky but you can’t repeat it at will. It was just an accident. The money is just as real of course. There’s a way to know statistically and of seeing the game a certain way. There’s a way to create a flexible firm plan.

An example of Return On Investment or ROI. In one year exact you put $500 in A and $600 in B investments. You get back $75 on A and $90 on B in profits. Turn each into a fraction and turn each into a percent. Such as: $75/$500 = 15% and $90/$600 = 15% respectively. Another example: in one year exact you put $1,000 each into investments A and B. You get back $75 and $90 respectively in profit. Turn A and B into fractions and turn each into a percent. Such as: $75/$1,000 = 7.5% and $90/$1,000 = 9% respectively. This is called rate of return.

To obtain a large percent of that money and the way to do that is to know and practice handicapping and profitcapping very well. Handicapping is predicting the order of finish positions of races well. Profitcapping is predicting the profit to be made from the in money positions from wager types and the payouts over months and years while dealing with each race on an individual and personal one on one basis. Don’t seek to make a few hundred dollars but 100’s of 1,000’s of dollars or a few millions of dollars. For this you need a business, a statistical and a thinking big money view-point. This is partially the secret of thinking big money and not thinking small money.

Two Golden Rules of Horse Racing Handicapping and Betting

Almost every human endeavor has a golden rule that the participants need to learn in order to be successful. Handicapping horse races is no exception. There are a few truths of the game that every horseplayer will eventually discover, many times by experience. While knowing the golden rules may not make you successful, not knowing the golden rules will almost always contribute to your failure.

There are many ways to arrive at a horse to bet on or an exotic combination, however the golden rules are immutable. They do not change no matter how many races you play or what kind of race you play. Off track or fast track, they don’t change. There are times when you’ll hate them and other times when you will rely on them. Don’t take them personally. They were true before you were born and when you’ve cashed your final ticket, they will still be going strong.

The first rule is that nothing works all the time. By that I mean that any angle you can think of or discover will work some of the time, but nothing will work all the time. There are sad stories of a horse player discovering an angle and playing it on paper for a long time before finally taking the plunge and betting on that angle. He builds confidence, it seems to always make him money so he finally mortgages the agrarian business and puts it all into his new money making wonder only to have the universe pull the switcheroo and to have it stop working.

He pours more and more into it certain that it will start to work again and make him money and guess what? That laughing sound you hear is the god’s having a good yuk on the hapless gambler because he didn’t believe it when he read that almost anything will work some of the time, but nothing works all the time.

Rule two is value and all that it implies when it comes to finding bets. Good horseplayers don’t look for good horses, they look for good bets and in my experience they are hard to find. What makes a bet a good one? Profit over the long run is the answer. It is a racing and betting scenario that when played many times will return the bettor’s original investment along with a profit. Some call it ROI. Because things are always changing at the track those profitable scenarios come and go which leads us back to rule one.

BE creative and always keep an open mind. Keep looking for the next good angle and don’t bet a dead horse when the universe hits the “off” switch and the angle goes South, so to speak. Know when to play it and when to pass it up.

Cooper’s Law – 14 Easy to Follow Rules to Make Money From Horse Racing

Betting on tri-casts seems an improbable means to punting profit, but professional backer Paul Cooper used it to win nearly £400,000 on a series of bets at Thirsk.

Cooper was one of the first to capitalize on the fact that horses drawn high seemed to have a pronounced advantage over the straight sprint course at Thirsk. There are a number of tracks around the country where, in soft ground, a particular draw can prove an enormous asset, but at Thirsk the same was true on fast going. It appears that the inadequacies of the course watering system left a strip of ground under the stand rails ‘un-sprinkled’ which was significantly faster than the rest of the track. By betting the five or six highest draw numbers – those most likely to grab the favoured ground – Cooper was able to pull off a series of major coups.

‘I was hooked on betting at a very young age,’ admits Cooper. ‘But even then I knew that you had to be in control of it – otherwise it would control you.’

During the 1970’s, the ITV Seven was introduced. It immediately caught Cooper’s eye. ‘One of my first wagers was a £1.90 bet which won over £800. I was in business! A couple of years later, I collected £13,365 on a £3 accumulator and I was really on my way.’ Cooper is still fascinated by multiple bets – the prospect of huge returns for a small outlay – and believes serious punters should not treat them in such a cavalier fashion.

‘The Lucky 15 is a value bet.- it is a Yankee that also has four win singles, and the different bookies offer a variety of bonuses and consolations. For instance, if only one of your selections wins, you may get double the odds. So just one 7/1 winner virtually guarantees your money back.’

Cooper’s penchant for what Barney Curley calls ‘miracle bets’ is not his only apparent similarity with the man in the street. Like all betting shop regulars, he is irresistibly drawn to competitive handicaps where they bet 6/1 the field – but he hits the target far more often.

Cooper insists that studying trainers is the key to his whole business operation. The fact that, as an owner, he has chosen to have horses trained by Barry Hills, Jimmy Fitzgerald and Robert Williams gives a clue to the men he most respects in the game.’ ‘There are certainly some trainers I much prefer to back,’ he says. ‘What I really look for is someone who is perhaps underestimated and as a result their horses start at bigger prices than they should do.’

So what can we learn from the fastidious, immaculately turned-out Mr Cooper? Well, here are his 7 great Do’s and Don’ts, known as “Cooper’s Law!”

Cooper’s Law – Dos

1: Do stay cool, calm and collected when making a selection, and don’t go in head down. Weigh up all the possibilities and then have the nerve to go through with it.

2: Do bet only when you are getting good value and shop around for the best early prices.

3: Do back horses that have winning form. Shy away from maidens – the form is unpredictable and unproven.

4: Do bet in sprints. The form is often more reliable than in longer distance flat races.

5: Do find a small, competent yard to follow; because it isn’t fashionable, you’ll almost certainly get a value price on their horses.

6: Do look at horses in the paddock, especially in the spring and autumn. You can usually discard quite a few which are obviously not ready or are showing all the signs of a hard season.

7: Do bet within your means. Reduce your stakes when having a bad run – and increase them when things are going well.

Cooper’s Law – Avoid

1: Don’t get drunk or mix alcohol with betting. You need your wits about you to pick winners and to deal objectively with losing.

2: Don’t back short-priced favorites. The returns simply isn’t good enough, and let’s face it, they often get turned over anyway.

3: Don’t chase your losses. There’s always another day.

4: Don’t bet heavily when there’s been a sudden change in the going.

5: Don’t back out of form trainers or stables or jockeys carrying overweight.

6: Don’t back heavily at Chester. The tight track is a law unto itself.

7: Don’t bet in races over 18 runners. This is when the horses will split into two or more groups, effectively making it two or three different races.

Logic System for Horse Race Betting

The best way to make money is to follow the same system that bookies do. This system can be applied even for casino gambling games. That system is to use logic. Other prominent betting systems are arbitrage and hedge systems. Let us focus on what logic betting system is and how to implement it to get paid better.

What is this logic betting system?

This logic system was developed by mathematicians using logical conclusions drawn from intense analysing different horse races. This is simple and definitely worth a try. Most people lose money on horse races is because they don’t have a plan of investment and they don’t know when to stop. All systems have their own pros and cons.

The governing principle of this system is that 33% of horses that win the races are marked as favourite. Taking that into account, if you bet in 10 games on the winner of the day, you will win 3. Start betting only 2% of your principal amount. Let us say you decide to bet a £150 or $250. 2% of this would be £3 or $5. This is the amount you will bet every time.

Next step in this requires checking the odds. Usually odds for the horses are predicted by analysts and put for public view. The odds should be more than 1.375 for a high percentage of win.

Now for the actual betting plan. Remember this sequence 1-1-2-4-8-16. Bet in the following way when you lose. For the first and second race bet 2% of the stake (£3 or $5). For the third race bet 2*2% of the stake (that is, £6or $10). For the fourth bet 4*2% (£12 or $20). For the fifth bet 8*2% (£24 or $40) and for the sixth, bet 16*2% (£48 or $80).

When you have lost all six games, stop for the day. By this time you would have lost £96 or $ 160. But this is rarely true when you are choosing the winner of the day. Also, when you have won even on game, stop for the day.

Once you have doubled your initial principal amount to £300 or $500, only then can you increase your bet to 2% of this amount. Till then you should keep betting at 2% of the first principal amount only. Now your stake will be £6 or $10. But if you lose money and your balance drops back to £150 or $250, go back to betting £3 or $5.

Your winnings will be low, but it will be steady. Taking that into account, you can win up to 5 times of your initial investment. All you need is patience and the urge to control your greed. By doing that, you can very well retire early.

Betting is an addiction, but you need to keep a steady mind over the shoulders and keep a keen eye over the bank roll.